Medical marijuana in schools: what school boards should know about California’s new law

On Oct. 9, Governor Gavin Newsom signed Senate Bill 223, or Jojo’s Act, which allows school districts to permit administration of medical marijuana on campus. Students must have a prescription and cannot smoke or vape their medicine.

The landmark law carries complexities, in part because marijuana is still prohibited by federal law. Loss of federal funding is a concern for some districts considering implementing such a policy.

Is it prudent for districts to allow medical marijuana on school grounds? Frances Rogers and Kate S. Im try to answer that question at Law.com. They note that similar laws exist in states like Washington, Colorado, Florida, Maine, New Jersey, Delaware, Illinois and New Mexico without major incident. SB223, they add, allows a school board to rescind the policy “for any reason, including, but not limited to, if the school district, county office of education, or charter school is at risk of, or has lost, federal funding as a result of the policy.”

Rogers and Im discuss ways to prevent abuse of the policy and best practices for school boards that wish to implement it in their districts.

Read the article here


Comments

K-12

Tuesday, August 11, 2020 - 04:59

School closures have hit special needs students especially hard. Parents of children with disabilities report their children backsliding without the expert, in-person interaction they once had.